Turn the Page

“You don’t need religion to have morals. If you can’t determine right from wrong then you lack empathy, not religion.”
— Unknown  (via juicyisnotcouture)

(Source: copulati0n, via ealperin)

lisalu22:

I love Neil Gaiman so damn much. Best advice on how to raise a reader—let them read…whatever they want to read.

lisalu22:

I love Neil Gaiman so damn much. Best advice on how to raise a reader—let them read…whatever they want to read.

(via neil-gaiman)

“For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.””

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

Everyone go read this immediately. As I decided last week, my life motto has been expanded from “Do your thing and don’t care if they like it” to include “If all your favorite books are by white men, I probably don’t think you’re a very interesting person.”

(via pollums)

If the ‘Great Book’ everyone’s told you that you ‘simply HAVE to read’ features women and POCs who are neither three-dimensional people nor even archetypical characters, but are rather two-dimensional stereotypes and plot devices who exist only to move the plot along and/or to help the ‘hero’ on his journey to wherever the hell he happens to be going? You’re not actually reading a Great Book. Or even a good book. Or, really, a book. You’re reading yet another piece of ism-happy, masturbatory, and self-congratulatory crap. No matter what your beloved English professor said way back when.

(via teland)

(via elle-lavender)

failedslacker:

timholtorf Riders are back. At least for this half. Knock on wood for me please.

Oh completely!

I was hoping they’d get a blowout in their favour.  They need one against Calgary.

White feminists:

split-the-coast:

When you discuss the wage gap, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Only white women make $0.77 to a man’s dollar.
  • Black women make about $0.68 to a man’s dollar.
  • Latina women make about $0.58 to a man’s dollar.

Intersectionality matters.

(via gailsimone)

The Best Tumblrs for Writers to Follow

amandaeoliver:

I have been on Tumblr for nearly four years and steadily been finding great accounts related to writing. Thought I’d share some of my favorites for other writers or aspiring writers. 

  • GENERAL

The Electric Typewriter I am convinced that Dan, the curator of tetw, has found and neatly catalogued every good bit of writing on the internet. I could be wrong, but check for yourself.

Last Nights Reading Drawings by Kate Gavino with quotes from readings in New York City.

The Rumblr The Tumblr account for The Rumpus. Their posts, reblogs, gifs, and horoscopes by Madame Clairevoyant make me giddy ever time they come up on my dashboard.

Press 53 A publisher of short fiction and poetry collections based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Their Poetry Wednesdays, Flash Fiction Fridays, and 53-story contests inspire many a sentence and story.

Penguin Classics From the editors of Penguin Books and Penguin Classics, they share quotes, photos, and, my personal favorite, Friday Final Lines. Every Friday, they offer the closing lines of a Penguin Classic.

The Paris Review Curated by their digital director Justin Alvarez, the quarterly literary magazine’s Tumblr is full of inspirational graphics and quotes that link to Paris Review articles, essays, and interviews well worth reading.

Button Poetry Even though they have only been around a little over a year, they consistently showcase new (and incredible) performance poets.

Yeah Write Everything creative writing related. Quotes, book lists, interesting articles and graphics

Electric Literatures Recommended Reading Recommended Reading is released on a four week curation cycle: beginning with a story chosen by Electric Literature, followed by an excerpt from an indie press, then an author recommendation, and finally a selection from a magazine’s archive. Each issue includes an editor’s note written by that week’s partner, introducing you to the work and their mission.

Black Balloon Publishing An independent press based out of New York City. They publish fiction, nonfiction, and memoir and “champion the weird, the unwieldy, and the unclassifiable.” They consistently publish great posts like Can You Identify the Handwriting of These 12 Famous Authors and Daddy Dearest: 10 Literary Fathers and Father Figures to be Glad Aren’t Your Own

Fwriction The online literary journal’s blog, “specializing in work that melts faces and rocks waffles.”

  • INSPIRATION

Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Although the account hasn’t been updated in nearly 5 months, there are several years of archives with words and definitions John Koenig created for emotions that otherwise leave us speechless. 

Today’s Document A little history always gets the words flowing for me. The Tumblr for the U.S. National Archives posts one document daily. 

Hello You Creatives A collective of humans being creative. Inspiration, inspiration, inspiration.

Creative Mornings/Findings In a slump? Come here for photos, quotes, projects, and more from other creatives.

  • BOOK STORES

Strand Books Based in New York City

Powell’s Books Based in Portland, Oregon

Open Books Store Based in Chicago, Illinois

  • FREELANCE & PUBLISHING

Calls for Submissions for Writers and Poets 

Writing Opportunities

Freelancer Real Talk

  • RECOMMENDED READING:

Writers No One Reads

NPR Books

**I will continually be adding to the list

(via 411forwriting)

I kinda like this version.

Even if it is short.

(Source: youtube.com)

“You know what’s sad about reading books? It’s that you fall in love with the characters. They grow on you. And as you read, you start to feel what they feel - all of them - you become them. And when you’re done, you’re never the same. Sure you’re still you, you look the same, talk in the same manner, but something in you has changed. Something in the way you think, the way you choose, sometimes, even the things you say may differ. But it all comes down to the state you go to after a nice novel. The after-feeling. It’s amazing, but somehow, you feel left alone by that world you were once in. It’s overwhelming. But it makes you sad. Cause for once you were this, this otherworldly being in… Neverwhere, and then you suddenly have to say goodbye after a few weeks from when you read the last page. When you’ve recovered from that state it’s just… quite sad.”
Suzanne Collins 

(via goldenfools)

(Source: atomos, via prettybooks)

spell-swords:

Skyrim has the best reviews on Steam

(Source: jimyvegas, via bluntlyblue)

art-of-swords:

How To Saber a Champagne Bottle

For the LOLs: A daring way to open a Champagne Bottle. Please do not try this at home. 

Read the full instructions here.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Alton Brown

maxkirin:

Hello, dear followers!

Ravensgem, my first book, is now available at Gumroad as a DRM-FREE eBOOK BUNDLE! What do you get in said bundle? Hassle-free digital versions of this book: EPUB (eReaders, iPhone, iPad, Smartphones, Tablet), MOBI (Kindle), PDF, & a Digital Thank-You Card. All for the price of… $4? Nope c;

☆ From now until July 27th, pick up this bundle for $2! That’s 50% OFF (whoa!) 

Of course, if you want you can still pick up this book on Amazon Kindle and as a Paperback. Remember that if you purchase the Paperback version of this book through Amazon you will get the Kindle Edition for FREE~ ♥︎

What exactly is this book about? Here’s the back-cover blurb:

"Citizens of Iryport, we have gathered here today to witness a challenge of honor."

After two years of running, Lucian Wade has returned to Iryport. He left the city to escape the mistakes of his youth and now, he hopes that the past — and those he left behind — have given up on finding him.

But the past is relentless, and the person chasing him is not ordinary.

Johanna Kin, the most rich and powerful noble on the peninsula, is also Lucian’s only childhood friend. She wants to see him— but she doesn’t want to talk. Johanna calls a challenge of honor between her and Lucian.

A duel to the death.

Gadeean tradition demands that challenges be fought not with saber nor pistol, but with the blessings of the ancients. Within the veins of every Gadeean runs the black blood of The Mountain, and only they can ignite the power hidden in gemstones.

Separated from his allies, forced to fight for his life, Lucian clutches his ravensgem, and the power locked within.

“For too long I’ve been a victim of fate…”

Please consider giving this a reblog, and a big thank you to everyone who has already picked up the bundle! The reception to this has been amazing! Thank you to all of you for directly supporting independent authors and artists~ ♥︎

(via maxkirin)